Posted by conrad
27 September, 2011

Tin Ceiling Tiles: DIY Installation Instructions — Part III

If you’ve been following along, we’ve been discussing the easy DIY instructions for installing decorative tin ceiling tiles in your home. Parts I and II showed how to prepare the room and ceiling for the project and how to determine the starting point for your tile installation. Part III is the final installment and when these steps are complete, the room will have a beautiful ceiling that proudly displays the tin ceiling tiles you’ve worked so hard to install.

Nail up tin ceiling tiles overlap each other as they’re installed — it’s a good idea to have the overlap in the same direction with each tile. You may also want to have this seam facing away from the entry door in case any overlaps don’t close completely, but this isn’t absolutely necessary. If your tin ceiling tiles have a directional design, take care to install them facing correctly.

Cornice Can Provide the Finishing Touch for Tin Ceiling Tiles

Use Decorative Cornice to Accent Your Tin Ceiling Tiles

Place your first tile in the center position you marked in Part II and tack it in place. Follow the previously marked lines to install the second tile taking care to overlap properly. You may find it easier to nail the tiles by drilling a small pilot hole first — especially through the overlaps.

Install Tin Ceiling Tiles from the Center of the Room 

The tin ceiling tiles are then nailed in parallel lines from your center starting position. Many DIYers find it helpful to snap additional chalk lines on the plywood ceiling to act as guides as they work toward the perimeter walls. The only nailing required is at the edges of the tiles — avoid nailing the decorative centers as it may detract from the ceiling’s appearance.

Choose from Many Styles of Cornice for your Tin Ceiling Tiles

Cornice can Match or Contrast with your Tin Ceiling Tiles

When you reach the perimeter of the room, there’s a good chance full tiles may not fit. If this is the case, the tin ceiling tiles can easily be cut with standard tin snips available at just about any hardware store. When measuring for your cut, remember to allow for overlaps at the preceding full tiles.

Tin Ceiling Tiles Edge Trim 

Many homeowners add edge trim around the perimeter of the ceiling as a nice finishing touch for the room. You may want to use a wood crown molding or Decorative Ceiling Tiles offers cornice trim that can accent your tin ceiling tiles. Regardless of which you use, the filler tiles at the perimeter of the ceiling only have to extend under the trim rather than fit tight against the wall. When your tile installation is complete, use clear silicone caulk to close any gaps in the overlaps. The room now has a beautiful new ceiling that was installed with your DIY labor and a few common tools.

Link to DecorativeCeilingTiles.net Shop

 

 

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